Federation Focus: Poland

01.04.2013

10 YEARS FIBA EUROPE

Being founded and having affiliated with FIBA in 1934, the Polish Basketball Federation (Polski Związek Koszykówki/PZKosz) is one of the eldest basketball federations in Europe. Looking back at the long history and building a bridge between the past and the present, PZKosz's mission is to further develop and modernize professional and amateur basketball in the country.

One of the federation's major goals is to ensure the development of current and future generations of basketball players. PZKosz cooperates with all clubs and provides them with the necessary tools to awaken interest among children and further increase the number of players. All programmes and initiatives are designed to create the best conditions and guarantee the sporting and social education of the young players.

Mateusz Ponitka (Poland)
Mateusz Ponitka is a great example for the next generation of Polish players: Having led Poland to silver at the 2010 World Championship, Ponitka easily made the transition to the senior team, playing significant minutes during the EuroBasket 2013 Qualification Round

Besides running youth championships in the age categories U14, U16, U18 and U20, the Polish federation manages the top national divisions in men's and women's basketball. 12 teams compete in the men's top-flight PLK, while 10 clubs fight for the title in the women's top league PLKK.

The Polish national team made their first international appearance at the premier Olympic basketball tournament in 1936. Out of the 23 participating countries, Poland finished in fourth spot, being the best-placed European team in the final standings. 

The biggest success for the men's senior national team came in 1963. Hosting the European Championship in Wroclaw, Poland went all the way to the gold medal game, suffering only one loss in the group stage and defeating Yugoslavia in the semi-final. In the final, the hosts faced powerhouse and reigning champions Soviet Union, falling 45-61 and clinching the silver medal in the end.

Home soil also proved successful for the women's senior team. Having debuted at the European Championship for Women in 1938 with a bronze, the women celebrated Poland's only gold medal 61 years later, at the European Championship for Women in 1999. Led by the late Malgorzata Dydek, who scored 19 points and grabbed 10 rebounds in the final, the Polish hosts downed France in the final, 59-56.

 

Hosts Poland are crowned champions at the European Championship for Women in 1999
Poland were crowned champions at the European Championship for Women in 1999, the only international title for any Polish national team up to date

 

 

STATS & FACTS

Year of foundation: 1934
President: Grzegorz Bachanski
Secretary General: Jacek Jakubowski
Homepage: www.pzkosz.pl

Registered players:
- Men: 34,885
- Women: 12,169
Registered clubs: 582
Registered coaches:
- Men: 1,264
- Women: 224

 

NATIONAL TEAM ACHIEVEMENTS

1936 Olympic Games: Tournament for Men in Berlin (Germany): 4th place
1937 European Championship for Men in Riga (Latvia): 4th place
1938 European Championship for Women in Rome (Italy): 3rd place
1939 European Championship for Men in Kaunas (Lithuania): 3rd place
1960 European Championship for Women in Sofia (Bulgaria): 4th place
1963 European Championship for Men in Wroclaw (Poland): 2nd place
1965 European Championship for Junior Women in Kjustendil, Lom, Botevgrad, Sofia (Bulgaria): 4th place
1965 European Championship for Men in Moscow, Tbilisi (Soviet Union): 3rd place
1967 European Championship for Men in Helsinki, Tampere (Finland): 3rd place
1968 European Championship for Women in Catania, Ragusa, Palermo, Messina (Italy): 3rd place
1969 European Championship for Junior Women in Köln, Lünen, Essen, Hohenlimburg, Hagen (Germany): 4th place
1969 European Championship for Men in Naples, Caserta (Italy): 4th place
1971 European Championship for Men in Essen, Böblingen (Germany): 4th place
1975 European Championship for Junior Women in Vigo (Spain): 2nd place
1977 European Championship for Junior Women in Haskovo, Dimitrovgrad (Bulgaria): 2nd place
1980 European Championship for Women in Maglaj, Brosanski Brod, Prijedor, Banja Luka (Yugoslavia): 2nd place
1981 European Championship for Women in Ancona, Senigallia (Italy): 2nd place
1986 European Championship for Junior Women in Perugia, Gualdo Tadino (Italy): 4th place
1992 European Championship for Junior Women in Kalamata, Tripolis, Patra (Greece): 3rd place
1993 World Championship for Junior Women in Seoul (Korea): 3rd place
1999 European Championship for Women in Poznan, Pruszkow, Katowice (Poland): 1st place
2000 European Championship for Junior Women in Cetniewo (Poland): 3rd place
2003 European Championship for Women in Pyrgos, Amaliada, Patras (Greece): 4th place
2005 U20 European Championship Women in Brno (Czech Republic): 2nd place
2005 U16 European Championship Women in Poznan (Poland): 3rd place
2007 U18 European Championship Women in Novi Sad (Serbia): 4th place
2009 U16 European Championship Men in Kaunas (Lithuania): 4th place
2010 U17 World Championship in Hamburg (Germany): 2nd place
2011 U20 European Championship Women in Novi Sad (Serbia): 3rd place


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