Federation Focus: Hungary

26 November 2012

10 YEARS FIBA EUROPE

The history of basketball in Hungary dates back to 1912, when Geza Kunce first introduced netball, which he discovered during his stay in Munich, Germany. In the early 1920's the official rule book was translated from German and released in Hungary, and with the School of Physical Education being founded in 1925, the popularity of the sport grew rapidly. In the same year, netball was integrated in the Hungarian Athletics Association, with Kunce being named the chairman of the six-member committee.

In 1933, netball was replaced by basketball. The first championship was organised with 10 participating teams, with the team of KEAC being crowned champions. The number of teams grew throughout the years, with 36 teams entering the competition in 1938. One of the main figures in developing the game was Dr. Ferenc Hepp. A graduate from Springfield College, Hepp became Director of the Hungarian School of Physical Education and of the Scientific Research Institute of Sports, and is nowadays widely considered as the father of Hungarian basketball.

When the Hungarian Basketball Federation (Magyar Kosárlabdázók Országos Szövetsége/MKOSZ) was founded in 1942, Kunce was elected President, while Hepp held the office of Vice President. In 1954, he was elected as President. For his contributions to Hungarian and international basketball, he was enshrined in the Naismith Hall of Fame in 1981, as well as in the FIBA Hall of Fame in 2007.

Hungary won their only EuroBasket title in 1955
Playing in front of their home crowd in Budapest, Hungary won their only gold medal at the European Championship 1955

Hungarian basketball saw its glory days in the 1950's. Having already clinched a bronze medal at the European Championship in 1946 and a silver medal in 1953, the men's senior national team made history at the European Championship in 1955. Playing in front of their home crowd in Budapest, Hungary lost only one game on their way to the gold medal, finishing with a 6-1 record in the Final Round.

Women's basketball has as well been established in the country, also witnessing a successful period in the 1950's, winning two silver medals and one bronze medal at the European Championship. They added four more medals to their collections, as they clinched successive bronze medals from 1983 to 1987, and one in 1991. The women also shined on club level, as two clubs managed to win the Ronchetti Cup. B.S.E. Budapest took the title in 1983, while GYSEV-RINGA Sopron came out victorious in 1998.

 

STATS & FACTS

Date of foundation: 15 November 1942
President: Ferenc Szalay
Secretary General: Tamas Sterbenz
Homepage: www.hunbasket.hu

Registered players:
- U18 Men: 11,184
- U18 Women: 5,650
- Senior Men: 15,176
- Senior Women: 4,810
Non-registered players:
- Juniors: approximately 3,000
- Seniors: approximately 1,000
Registered clubs: 552
Registered coaches: 647

Headquarters of the Hungarian Basketball Federation
The headquarters of the Hungarian Basketball Federation are based in capital Budapest

 

NATIONAL TEAM ACHIEVEMENTS

1950 European Championship for Women in Budapest (Hungary): 2nd place
1952 European Championship for Women in Moscow (Soviet Union): 3rd place
1953 European Championship for Men in Moscow (Russia): 2nd place
1954 European Championship for Women in Belgrade (Yugoslavia): 4th place
1955 European Championship for Men in Budapest (Hungary): 1st place
1956 European Championship for Women in Prague (Czechoslovakia): 2nd place
1957 European Championship for Men in Sofia (Bulgaria): 4th place
1957 World Championship for Women in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil): 5th place
1959 European Championship for Men in Istanbul (Turkey): 4th place
1963 European Championship for Men in Wroclaw (Poland): 4th place
1969 European Championship for Junior Women in Köln, Lünen, Essen, Hohenlimburg, Hagen (Germany): 5th place
1974 European Championship for Women in Sassari, Nuoro, Cagliari (Italy): 4th place
1975 European Championship for Junior Women in Vigo (Spain): 5th place
1976 European Championship for Cadettes in Szecsin (Poland): 2nd place
1977 European Championship for Junior Women in Haskovo, Dimitrovgrad (Bulgaria): 5th place
1979 European Championship for Junior Women in Capo d'Orlando, Piazza Armerina, Catania, Palermo, Messina (Italy): 2nd place
1981 European Championship for Junior Women in Eger, Kecskemét (Hungary): 4th place
1983 European Championship for Women in Miskolc, Zalaegerszeg, Budapest (Hungary): 3rd place
1985 European Championship for Women in Vicenza, Treviso (Italy): 3rd place
1987 European Championship for Women in Jerez, Puerto Santa Maria, Cadiz (Spain): 3rd place
1980 Olympic Games : Tournament for Women in Moscow (Soviet Union): 4th place
1984 European Championship for Cadettes in Perugia, Marsciano (Italy): 5th place
1985 European Championship for Cadettes in Tuzla (Yugoslavia): 4th place
1991 European Championship for Cadettes in Estarreja, Travasso, Anadia (Portugal): 4th place
1991 European Championship for Women in Tel Aviv (Israel): 3rd place
1993 European Championship for Cadettes in Poprad (Slovak Republic): 5th place
1994 European Championship for Junior Women in Veliko Tarnovo (Bulgaria): 3rd place
1997 European Championship for Women in Pécs, Zalaegerszeg, Budapest (Hungary): 4th place
2004 European Championship for Women U20 in St. Brieuc, Vannes, Quimper (France): 4th place
2004 European Championship for Women U18 in Bratislava (Slovak Republic): 3rd place
2006 U20 European Championship Women in Sopron (Hungary): 2nd place


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